Information for Lawyers

cbm Canada
3844 Stouffville Road,
PO Box 800
Stouffville ON L4A 7Z9
Toll Free: 1.800.567.2264
P. (905) 640.6464
F. (905) 640.4332

Legal name:
Christian Blind Mission International

Charitable Registration Number:
10691 8329 RR0001

cbm Contact:
Grace Soukup, Manager, Planned Giving
T. 905-640-6464 x288
1-800-567-2264 x288

Information for Executors and Estate Trustees

cbm Canada’s Estate Administration Policy

Legal name: Christian Blind Mission International
Operating as: cbm
Canada

The following is information cbm Canada requires from the Executor(s) in order to demonstrate to third-parties, such as its external auditor, that the full wishes of the deceased have been carried out according to their Last Will and Testament.

For a Specific Bequest:

  1. A copy of the Notice of Application for Certificate of Appointment of Estate Trustee with a Will or Letters Probate.
  2. A copy of the pertinent portion of the Will where cbm Canada is listed to receive the specific bequest.

For a Residual Bequest:

  1. A copy of the Notice of Application for Certificate of Appointment of Estate Trustee with a Will or Letters Probate.
  2. A copy of the entire Will.
  3. A copy of the List of Assets and their value at date of death.
  4. A copy of Executor’s interim and final accounting of receipts and disbursements for revenue accounts and capital accounts.

cbm Canada’s Process for Handling Requests by Excecutor(s) to Vary the Will:

  1. cbm Canada will ask for the request to vary the Will to be submitted by the Executor(s) in writing along with a copy of any background documentation that the Executor(s) may have.
  2. cbm Canada will forward the estate file to cbm Canada’s legal counsel who will review the file and advise cbm Canada on next steps.
  3. cbm Canada’s lawyer will communicate either directly to the Executor(s) or to the legal counsel for the estate.

Download PDF files

  1. cbm Canada’s Estate Administration Policy
  2. Responsibilities and Duties of the Estate Trustee

Legacy of Love
Tips for Preparing your Will

What a beautiful world

After battling cancer for ten years, Paul died when he was just 49. “He always said he wouldn’t live to be 50. He just had a gut feeling,” Laurie, his wife, shares.

One thing he didn’t predict though, was that the cancer would take away his sight.

“When Paul went blind, he was devastated…his eyes were so important to him…” Laurie remembers.

“He had really sharp eyes. In the country, the hawks were flying around in abundance. Paul carried a tiny telescope so that he could look at the hawks up close… earning him the nickname ‘Hawkeyes’.” Paul would call out to Laurie, “Hawk at 12 o’clock” or “Hawk at 9 o’clock.”

“Now, whenever I see a hawk… I think of him,” adds Laurie quietly.

Paul’s other passion was astronomy… he especially loved studying the moon.

At the time, Laurie and Paul were living in the suburbs. But it was getting busier and brighter with more houses, more traffic and worse…. more lights!

So they bought two acres in the country where it was gloriously dark at night.

At that time, Paul started to take pictures of the moon. To take quality pictures – worthy of being published in astronomy magazines – his lens had to be open for up to one hour… in total darkness. Any light would ruin his picture. Every time a car drove by, he had to start over.

They kept all the lights off inside the house whenever Paul was studying the sky. “I learned to find my way in the dark,” Laurie says with a laugh.

Paul’s hobby took them on some interesting adventures. Once, they went to Jamaica to see Halley’s Comet. “It’s nice and dark there with fewer stars in the southern hemisphere,” says Laurie. But, this involved bringing large equipment across the border.

LaurieAt the border crossing, Laurie attempted to make a joke when they were being questioned about their odd equipment. She told the crossing guards, “You could hide a body in there!”

Paul thought it was funny… the crossing guards didn’t. It led to a three-hour delay!

Although his astronomy hobby was very exciting, Paul would often get bored in the evenings, waiting for darkness. So, he decided to learn a new hobby – building model airplanes. He taught himself everything he needed to know.

He became an instructor on how to fly model airplanes. And if his students asked questions about how to build them, he could answer them.

“Paul was very generous with his time. He [also] taught Boy Scouts and his nephews all about model airplanes.”

Although Paul’s life was cut short, he packed a lot of wonder and generosity and fun into those 49 years.

To honour the memory of Paul, Laurie has decided to leave a final gift in her Will to help people living with blindness. It’s a legacy to pay tribute to her husband and how much he valued his keen eyesight.

”I would very much like to see the funds help many people to see our beautiful world,” Laurie says.