End the pain of trachoma today!

Protect mothers and children like Anwar from blindness. Your gift will be MULTIPLIED 8X in value.

Flies are a fact of everyday life in impoverished communities like Amhara, Ethiopia. But they bring with them a painful, debilitating disease: trachoma.

The flies are attracted to the mucus and discharge on the faces of children infected with trachoma. The flies pick up the infection and spread it to others. Soon, entire communities are struggling with this vicious disease.

Many adults are left completely blind, unable to work or care for their children. But there is a solution – a way to save the sight of these boys and girls and those who care for them.

Fly
Multiply your gift 8 times

Make 8X the difference in the lives of mothers and children today.

Thanks to antibiotics donated by pharmaceutical company Pfizer Inc.™ your gift multiplies in value to restore the sight to eight times as many moms and their young children suffering from trachoma.

1 pill equals 8 pills of medication - 8 times multiplier

The fear of trachoma

“I am worried for the future of my children,” says Ansha, a mother in Ethiopia infected with trachoma. “I need to look after them. What if they get infected too? I don’t want them to suffer this pain.”

Ansha’s six children rely on her to care for them. In order to do that, she needs to work their farm and sell her homemade cooking pots. But with every blink, trachoma is making her go blind. What will happen to her children then?

“I pray to God that He might protect us.”

You can prevent pain and blindness from trachoma, so mothers like Ansha can continue to care for their children.

“It felt as if something had gotten into my eye. It pierced and scratched. I kept
rubbing my eyes constantly. My eyes were watering so much that I could hardly see anything. I couldn’t make or sell the Mogdus, couldn’t cook or look after my youngest son. I was desperate.”

Ansha

Protect 8X more mothers and children

How trachoma blinds

Step 1

INFECTION:
Flies carrying trachoma land near the victim’s eye or come into contact with the tears or dirty hands of someone with the disease.

Step 2

PAIN:
The infection causes painful small cuts on the underside of the eyelid, which then leads to scarring. The eyelid starts to turn inward.

Step 3

DAMAGE:
The in-turned eyelashes scrape the eyeball like sandpaper, causing pain and damage with every blink.

Step 4

SCARRING:
As the cornea is cut and then heals, scar tissue forms, clouding sight and leading to permanent visual impairment.

Step 5

BLINDNESS:
Eventually, the scarring is so bad that the cornea is destroyed. The victim is permanently, irreversibly blind.

Imagine ... instead of eyelids, sheets of sandpaper cover your eyes. Scraping every time you blink. The pain is unbearable. Blindness is inevitable. And it’s completely preventable.

Your gift today will save 8X as many moms and kids from the pain and blindness of trachoma.

Please give generously today to rush 8X the value of life-changing medication before permanent blindness sets in.

You can eliminate trachoma

By helping communities stop the spread of the infection, you can stop the pain and blindness of trachoma for good.

cbm is using the World Health Organization’s proven strategy to fight trachoma, which combines prevention and treatment.

Surgery

SURGERY
Eyelid surgery to stop the blinding stage of the disease.

Antibiotics

ANTIBIOTICS
Pfizer-donated Zithromax® to treat and prevent active infection.

Fashwashing

FACE-WASHING
Facial cleanliness to help reduce transmission of disease.

Environmental Change

ENVIRONMENTAL
Change to improve access to clean water and sanitation.

Trachoma elimination is in sight

World map of trachoma control areas
1
trachoma is the leading infectious cause of blindness.
58
countries endemic of trachoma
232M+
people are at risk of trachoma.
USD $3-6B
lost in productivity per year due to trachoma.
1
country validated elimination of trachoma.
8
countries reported elimination of trachoma.
Bubula trachoma surgery photos

Bubula’s prayers are answered

Bubula is a widow living in a small village in Ethiopia, the country with the most cases of trachoma in the world. She’s the sole provider for her five children.

When she felt itching behind her eyelids, she knew the pain would soon follow. She’d had trachoma once before, and she recognized the telltale sign.

She also knew if she lost her sight, she and her children would end up begging on the streets to survive.

Then a community worker came to her village and announced a clinic day funded by cbm. The nurse told her she had trachoma in both eyes. If she didn’t get surgery right away, she could lose her sight completely.

The eyelid surgery lasted only 15 minutes, but changed the future for Bubula and her children.

“I’m very happy. My eye pains are gone. Thank you so much,” Bubula says.

Help more moms like Bubula be free of pain and blindness.